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Bison at Antelope Island, Utah State Park 2017

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Eyes to the Sky tonight, and can you hear them yet?

I don't know where most of you are, but it might be interesting to check out the sky tonight.  I remember seeing the Aurorae in Milwaukee Wisconsin, (under city light) in the late 50's when there were big solar flares reported.  Please let me know if you see anything, and where you are.



NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory snapped this X-ray photo of the Sun early in the morning of Sunday, August 1st. The dark arc near the top right edge of the image is a filament of plasma blasting off the surface - part of the coronal mass ejection. The bright region is an unassociated solar flare. (NASA)
NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory snapped this X-ray photo of the Sun
early in the morning of Sunday, August 1st. The dark arc near the top right
edge of the image is a filament of plasma blasting off the surface - part of
the coronal mass ejection. The bright region is an unassociated solar flare.
(NASA)  Watch amazing video of the eruption below.
Early Sunday morning the sun woke from a relatively quiet period of activity and launched a solar flare carrying charged particles expected to strike the Earth tonight. The coronal mass ejection (CME) was one of possibly two that will light up the night sky in some places tonight and in the coming days.
What is being termed a “solar tsunami” – a wall of charged ion particles – is expected to trigger a geomagnetic storm visible in the northern latitudes. The aurorae, normally only visible at extreme northern latitudes, are expected to put on a show for areas as far south as the northern contiguous United States the nights of August 3rd and 4th.
"This eruption is directed right at us, and is expected to get here early in the day on August 4th," said astronomer Leon Golub of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). "It's the first major Earth-directed eruption in quite some time."

above is from the San Francisco Examiner web site
The second subject I'm curious about is crickets.  While your out looking for the Northern Lights, do you hear any crickets?  We were out on the deck last night and it was very, very quiet.  No crickets yet.
   We thought we should start to hear them soon, and wondered if the first audible cricket night was different around the country.  So, if and when you hear them, could you let me know?

I remember an old saying from my childhood said something like first frost comes six weeks after first cricket song.  That would put it sometime in October.  Just about right for Wisconsin.
Do you remember any weather sayings from your childhood?



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5 comments:

  1. Just knee high by the fourth of July, which is kind of pushing it for a weather saying. :)

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  2. P.S. Haven't heard any crickets yet, but have been noticing this year's crop of grasshoppers up in the Idaho mountains. :)

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  3. We see a lot of crickets but I don't recall hearing them. Maybe I'm not paying attention?

    I think I'll set the alarm tonight and go out after midnight (can't stay awake that late).

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  4. We hear a lot of katydids every night. The way the heat and humidity has been the past week or so you would think we've already been zapped by the sun. LOL
    Take care & be safe.
    Mike & Gerri

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  5. Good dispatch and this enter helped me alot in my college assignement. Thank you on your information.

    ReplyDelete

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